Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update for Parents

Updated March 25, 2020

Important Updates

The coronavirus pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation. U-M officials and medical experts, in close coordination with the state and local public health experts, are closely monitoring for developments and will offer additional guidance to our community as soon as it is available.

View additional information about Michigan Medicine’s preparedness for coronavirus.

Message from our Chief Operating Officer

Luanne Thomas Ewald

“We are prepared and we are passionate about helping our families and communities confidently face the challenges the coronavirus pandemic brings our way.”

Luanne Ewald
COO, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital

 

Steps C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is Taking to Manage the Coronavirus Outbreak

Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is following the evolving situation closely and actively preparing for potential patients. We have activated our comprehensive emergency response teams, which are ready at all times for emergencies.

Monitoring patients: Michigan Medicine is monitoring patients to quickly identify those with increased risk of exposure and need for possible COVID-19 testing. We have established new guidelines providing access to face masks for all health care workers, and have suspended family and visitor access at the hospital, with limited exceptions, to protect our patients and health care team from additional exposure.

Coordinating with public health officials: We are working closely with public health officials at the local, state and national levels to monitor the spread of the virus as well as our colleagues at the University of Michigan main campus. Public health officials are providing quarantine guidance and monitoring of individuals identified as being “at risk.”

We are also working with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services on availability of COVID-19 testing, and have begun our own COVID-19 testing service to expand testing capacity for the communities we serve.

Supplies and facilities: Michigan Medicine is monitoring crucial supplies like masks, hand sanitizer and other personal protective equipment and is proactively placing orders for additional supplies.

We are also accepting donations of protective gear from the community.

Enhanced access to outpatient care: To help families receive appropriate care with minimal risk of spreading disease in their communities wherever possible, we have taken several key steps:

  • 24-7 COVID-19 Hotline for established adult Michigan Medicine patients with questions about symptoms, home management, whether medical treatment is required and what specific steps they should follow to receive care or testing. Learn more about the COVID-19 Hotline under the question below: "I think my child has coronavirus or COVID-19, what do I do?"
  • Curbside COVID-19 screening: Curbside COVID-19 screening for established Michigan Medicine patients will be offered from select Michigan Medicine health center locations by referral only.
  • Virtual Care expansion: Michigan Medicine providers are expanding access to E-Visits and Video Visits to allow existing patients to continue to receive regular care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

COVID-19 Information and Updates for Our Patients

What is Novel Coronavirus COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a disease caused by a newly identified coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. It has been diagnosed in multiple locations worldwide and has received widespread attention from public health authorities and the news media. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, human coronaviruses are common throughout the world and usually cause mild to moderate illness in people. This new virus is a public health concern because:                      
  • It is newly identified, so much is still unknown about it.
  • Two other human coronaviruses, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, have caused severe illness.

Who is at risk of getting COVID-19?

In Michigan, we are seeing community spread of COVID-19, which means that there is some risk of exposure for everyone. 

Exposure risk is higher for:

  • Healthcare workers and for those who have prolonged close contact with someone who has COVID-19.
  • Elderly people and those with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk of more severe infection.

You can lower your risk of exposure by practicing social distancing including staying at least 6 feet away from people, limiting contact with large groups of people, and washing your hands frequently.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

According to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. They include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

Illness due to COVID-19 infection is generally mild, especially for children and young adults. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing).

Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19.

I think my child has coronavirus or COVID-19, what do I do?

If your child is experiencing life-threatening symptoms, please call 911.                  

E-Visits for COVID-19 symptoms: E-Visits are now available for Michigan Medicine patients experiencing cough, flu or COVID-19 like symptoms. Learn more about E-Visits.

Michigan Medicine COVID-19 Hotline: 734-763-6336Michigan Medicine has opened a hotline for established adult Michigan Medicine patients with questions about symptoms, home management, whether medical treatment is required and what specific steps they should follow to receive care or testing.

The hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, only for patients and employees of Michigan Medicine.

COVID-19 testing: If it is determined that your child should get tested for COVID-19, you may be directed to one of three curbside testing locations Michigan Medicine has set up. Please note that curbside testing is only available to patients with a referral from the Michigan Medicine hotline or a Michigan Medicine health provider.

Questions not related to COVID-19 symptoms should be directed to your child’s primary care provider’s office.

If you do not have a primary care provider, contact your local health department. In Washtenaw County, that number is 734-544-6700.

Stay at home and limit your child’s exposure to other members of your household if they are sick.

In many cases, COVID-19 can be managed without emergency care. However, if your child’s symptoms are severe and you are in an emergency situation, call 911 or go to your local emergency room.

What if my child does not have a primary care physician?

If you are not in an emergency situation, the best thing to do is to keep your child at home. In many cases, COVID-19 can be managed without emergency care. However, if your symptoms are severe and you are in an emergency situation, call 911 or go to your local emergency room.

How does COVID-19 spread?

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) says health experts are still learning about how this new coronavirus spreads. Other coronaviruses spread from an infected person to others through:                        
  • The air by coughing and sneezing
  • Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands
  • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes
  • In rare cases, contact with feces

What steps can I take to prevent the spread of COVID-19 or flu?

If you or your child is ill, stay home and rest. Here are other everyday actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses:&                  
  • Adults and children should wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. (Check out our video: "Wash Your Hands: Fight Germs with the University of Michigan Fight Song")
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Keep your child or other family members home if they are sick.
  • If you haven’t done so, it’s not too late to get a flu vaccine.
  • Watch the video: "Wash Your Hands: Fight Germs with the University of Michigan Fight Song"

Visit our COVID-19 Patient-Specific Guidelines page to view or download information for patients with specific conditions or who are being treated at certain Michigan Medicine clinics. This page will be update as we learn more about the disease.

How is COVID-19 treated?

There are currently no tested therapies proven to prevent or treat COVID-19. Treatments are instead focused on supporting the patient and managing symptoms, helping the patient to breathe, and allowing the body to fight the infection and heal.                    

University of Michigan faculty are closely monitoring a number of potential treatments in development around the world, including several therapies currently being investigated here at Michigan Medicine.

Is my child at greater risk due to a medical condition?

According to the CDC and WHO, people at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 include older adults over 60 and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like:

  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Lung disease
  • Cancer
  • People with compromised immune systems

People with compromised immune systems include those:

  • With primary or acquired immunodeficiency
  • On anti-rejection therapy following organ or bone marrow transplant
  • On biologic therapeutic agents
  • With malignant cancers or receiving or who have recently received chemotherapy
  • Receiving systemic immunosuppressive therapy, including corticosteroids equivalent to 20 mg a day of prednisone for 2 weeks or longer

If you are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, watch closely for symptoms and emergency warning signs. If you feel like you are developing symptoms, call your doctor immediately.

Get medical attention immediately if you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19, including:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Blue-colored lips or face

This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Visit our COVID-19 Patient-Specific Guidelines page to view or download information for patients with specific conditions or who are being treated at certain Michigan Medicine clinics. This page will be updated as we learn more about the disease.

What should I do about scheduled appointments?

Michigan Medicine providers are expanding access to E-Visits and Video Visits to allow existing patients to continue receiving regular care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Provider offices are contacting some patients to transition scheduled appointments to an E-Visit format, and some new appointment requests may also be scheduled as Video Visits.

Contact your clinic with other questions about appointments, or visit our Virtual Care page to determine if an E-Visit or Video Visit could help you avoid the need to visit a clinic.

How can I help my child cope during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Video Resources

To view other videos in this series, click on the icon in the upper right of the video screen.