Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update for Parents

The coronavirus pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation. U-M officials and medical experts, in close coordination with the state and local public health experts, are closely monitoring for developments and will offer additional guidance to our community as soon as it is available.

Message from our Chief Operating Officer

Luanne Thomas Ewald

“We are prepared and we are passionate about helping our families and communities confidently face the challenges the coronavirus pandemic brings our way.”

Luanne Ewald
COO, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital

 

Steps C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is Taking to Manage the Coronavirus Outbreak

Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is following the evolving situation closely and actively preparing for potential patients. We have activated our comprehensive emergency response teams, which are ready at all times for emergencies.

Enhanced access to outpatient care

To help families receive appropriate care with minimal risk of spreading disease in their communities wherever possible, we have taken several key steps:

  • 24-7 COVID-19 Hotline: 734-763-6336Michigan Medicine has opened a hotline for established Michigan Medicine patients with questions about symptoms, home management, whether medical treatment is required and what specific steps they should follow to receive care or testing.The hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, only for patients and employees of Michigan Medicine.

  • Curbside COVID-19 screening: If it is determined that your child should get tested for COVID-19, you may be directed to one of three curbside testing locations Michigan Medicine has set up. Please note that curbside testing is only available to patients with a referral from the Michigan Medicine hotline or a Michigan Medicine health provider.

  • Virtual Care expansion: Michigan Medicine providers are expanding access to E-Visits and Video Visits to allow existing patients to continue to receive regular care during the COVID-19 pandemic. For questions and answers about E-Visits and Video Visits, see our Virtual Care Frequently Asked Questions page.

Monitoring patients

Michigan Medicine is monitoring patients to quickly identify those with increased risk of exposure and the need for possible COVID-19 testing. We have established new guidelines providing access to face masks for all health care workers, and have suspended family and visitor access at the hospital, with limited exceptions, to protect our patients and health care team from additional exposure.

Condition specific guidelines

We are providing additional guidance for patients with specific medical conditions or in certain categories. Visit our COVID-19 Patient-Specific Guidelines page on uofmhealth.org to view coronavirus prevention information developed for you.

Temporary clinic changes

In order to limit exposure for our patients, their families, and our staff, we have made several adjustments at our outpatient clinics, and many of our clinics are scaling back operations temporarily. Visit the Appointment Locations Update page on uofmhealth.org to see if your clinic is affected.

Supplies and facilities

Michigan Medicine is monitoring crucial supplies like masks, hand sanitizer and other personal protective equipment and is proactively placing orders for additional supplies. We are also accepting donations from the community.


COVID-19 Information and Updates for Our Patients

What is Novel Coronavirus COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a disease caused by a newly identified coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. It has been diagnosed in multiple locations worldwide and has received widespread attention from public health authorities and the news media. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, human coronaviruses are common throughout the world and usually cause mild to moderate illness in people. This new virus is a public health concern because:      
  • It is newly identified, so much is still unknown about it.
  • Two other human coronaviruses, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, have caused severe illness.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

According to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. They include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Other less common symptoms have been reported, including gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Illness due to COVID-19 infection is generally mild, especially for children and young adults. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing).

Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19.

I think my child has coronavirus or COVID-19, what do I do?

If your child is experiencing life-threatening symptoms, please call 911.

Stay at home and away from others if your child is sick. In many cases, COVID-19 can be managed without emergency care. However, if your child’s symptoms are severe and you are in an emergency situation, call 911 or go to your local emergency room.

COVID-19 Hotline:

The Michigan Medicine COVID-19 Hotline is available for established Michigan Medicine patients for questions about symptoms, home management, whether medical treatment is required and what specific steps you should follow to receive care or testing. The hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, only for patients and employees of Michigan Medicine. Call the hotline at 734-763-6336.

E-Visits and Video Visits:

Michigan Medicine providers are expanding access to E-Visits and Video Visits to allow existing patients to be evaluated for symptoms of COVID-19.

COVID-19 testing: 

If it is determined that your child should get tested for COVID-19, you may be directed to one of three curbside testing locations Michigan Medicine has set up. Please note that curbside testing is only available to patients with a referral from the Michigan Medicine hotline or a Michigan Medicine health provider.

Patient-Specific Guidelines for COVID-19

Many of our specialty clinics have developed COVID-19 guidelines for their patients with medical conditions. Visit our COVID-19 Patient-Specific Guidelines page to view these guidelines organized by category.

Should I be worried about the new multi-system inflammatory syndrome being reported in children and adolescents?

New reports suggest that a rare and potentially fatal inflammatory disease linked to the novel coronavirus is afflicting a small number of kids. Pediatric health experts are closely monitoring new data, emphasizing that while parents should learn about the new condition and know the symptoms – they also shouldn’t panic.  

Read more about the new syndrome here

What if my child does not have a primary care physician?

If you are not in an emergency situation, the best thing to do is to keep your child at home. In many cases, COVID-19 can be managed without emergency care. However, if your symptoms are severe and you are in an emergency situation, call 911 or go to your local emergency room.

How does COVID-19 spread?

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) says health experts are still learning about how this new coronavirus spreads. Other coronaviruses spread from an infected person to others through:                  
  • The air by coughing and sneezing
  • Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands
  • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes
  • In rare cases, contact with feces

What steps can I take to prevent the spread of COVID-19?

If you or your child is ill, stay home and rest. Here are other everyday actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses:                                            
  • Adults and children should wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. (Check out our video: "Wash Your Hands: Fight Germs with the University of Michigan Fight Song")
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Adults and children over the age of 2 should wear a cloth face cover or mask to cover your mouth and nose when you’re out in public.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Keep your child or other family members home if they are sick.
  • If you haven’t done so, it’s not too late to get a flu vaccine.
  • Watch the video: "Wash Your Hands: Fight Germs with the University of Michigan Fight Song"

Visit our COVID-19 Patient-Specific Guidelines page to view or download information for patients with specific conditions or who are being treated at certain Michigan Medicine clinics. This page will be update as we learn more about the disease.

How is COVID-19 treated?

There are currently no tested therapies proven to prevent or treat COVID-19. Treatments are instead focused on supporting the patient and managing symptoms, helping the patient to breathe, and allowing the body to fight the infection and heal. University of Michigan faculty are closely monitoring a number of potential treatments in development around the world, including several therapies currently being investigated here at Michigan Medicine.
For more information, read Chloroquine, Ibuprofen and Beyond: Doctors Discuss Latest Treatments, and Treatment Rumors, For COVID-19 on the Michigan Medicine Health Lab blog.

Is my child at greater risk due to a medical condition?

According to the CDC and WHO, people at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 include older adults over 60 and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like:                    

 

  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Lung disease
  • Cancer
  • People with compromised immune systems

People with compromised immune systems include those:

  • With primary or acquired immunodeficiency
  • On anti-rejection therapy following organ or bone marrow transplant
  • On biologic therapeutic agents
  • With malignant cancers or receiving or who have recently received chemotherapy
  • Receiving systemic immunosuppressive therapy, including corticosteroids equivalent to 20 mg a day of prednisone for 2 weeks or longer

If you are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, watch closely for symptoms and emergency warning signs. If you feel like you are developing symptoms, call your doctor immediately.

Get medical attention immediately if you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19, including:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Blue-colored lips or face

This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Visit our COVID-19 Patient-Specific Guidelines page to view or download information for patients with specific conditions or who are being treated at certain Michigan Medicine clinics. This page will be updated as we learn more about the disease.

What should I do about scheduled appointments?

Michigan Medicine providers are expanding access to E-Visits and Video Visits to allow existing patients to continue receiving regular care during the COVID-19 pandemic.                    

 

Provider offices are contacting some patients to transition scheduled appointments to an E-Visit format, and some new appointment requests may also be scheduled as Video Visits.

Contact your clinic with other questions about appointments, or visit our Virtual Care page to determine if an E-Visit or Video Visit could help you avoid the need to visit a clinic.

What can I do to help support Michigan Medicine's COVID-19 response?

Philanthropic contributions

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues to evolve, we are coordinating efforts across Michigan Medicine to care for patients while also protecting the health of our faculty, staff, patients, visitors, and community. If you would like to support this effort, please visit Michigan Medicine's Support our COVID-19 Response page to learn how.

Donate supplies

We have set up a drive-through donation site for specific items at the North Campus Research Complex, set back from Plymouth Road and Huron Parkway. It is open weekdays, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Items may also be shipped to this location. A list of items we are currently in need of can be found on Michigan Medicine's Support our COVID-19 Response page.

North Campus Research Complex
2800 Plymouth Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48109


Helping Your Child Cope During the COVID-19 Pandemic

We understand that this is an especially stressful time for our patients and families. Below are some helpful resources for supporting our patients during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Thrive with your family web series

Michigan Medicine's C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is supporting families during the pandemic through a weekly video series called “Thrive With Your Family” that will address parents’ top questions. Episodes will be broadcast on Tuesdays at noon EST on the Mott Facebook page (@MottChildren) and the Michigan Medicine YouTube channel.

To view previous episodes or to submit a topic or ask questions for the panel to answer in an upcoming episode, visit www.mottchildren.org/thrive.

The series will involve a nationally recognized panel leading candid conversations about parenting, child behavior, mental health and relationships in this fast-changing environment. It will tackle the stressors, concerns and difficulties families are facing. Experts will also talk about how to maintain a sense of hope and understanding, and tips for maintaining a problem-solving mindset even amidst circumstances that can feel out of our control.

Well-being resources

colorful puzzle pieces

6 Ways to Support Children with Autism During the Pandemic

graphic of father hugging a child

Strategies for Helping Your Child Cope

Graphic of kids of all ages by height

Supporting Children and Teens

Teenage male student on his laptop

8 Ways to Help Teens Cope with Social Distancing Blues

Water bottle, fruit, iphone, and barbell

4 Strategies for Staying Healthy in a Quarantined World

Graphic of book and and iphone

Stuck at Home? 6 Ways to Keep Your Kids Healthy and Happy

vidoe image of Dr. Radesky

Social Distancing With Kids

School Building

Coronavirus, Kids and School Closings

Mom and little girl

How to talk to your kids about COVID-19


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Video Resources

To view other videos in the playlist, click on the playlist icon in the upper right of the video screen.


Support Our COVID-19 Response, Recognize Our Workers

Two Ways to Donate

Are you looking for ways to help during the COVID-19 pandemic? By donating to our COVID-19 Philanthropic Fund or contributing gifts of personal protective equipment (PPE) or other health care items, you can help accelerate our efforts to positively impact the course of the pandemic in Michigan, the nation, and the world. Visit the Support Our COVID-19 Response page for more information about how to give.

Recognize Our Frontline Workers: #HailToTheFrontLine

Message written on a sidewalk in chalk

 
Recognize the teams at Michigan Medicine by posting your message of gratitude and encouragement on social media using the tag #HailToTheFrontline. If you aren’t a social media user, you can upload your message directly at www.UofMHealth.org/frontline by clicking on the “Add your message of encouragement” button.

To see some of the messages posted already, visit www.UofMHealth.org/frontline

 

 


COVID-19 Health Information, Research and News

Sign up for email updates: Visit the COVID-19 Email Updates page to sign up to receive regular email updates from Michigan Medicine with news and resources about the coronavirus.

Read the latest stories and research information from our Michigan Health and Michigan Health Lab blogs and News Room.