NICU Care Team

Many different people are involved in the care of premature or sick babies. The C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital NICU team is made up of leading experts specially trained in the care of critically ill newborns. Our exceptional team of neonatologists, nurses, fellows, residents, respiratory therapists and other health care professionals all work together to ensure your child receives the best possible care and treatment.

Here are some general descriptions of the various types of people that may be involved in your care:

Family - We want you to take part in the care of your baby whenever possible. When you come to the Brandon NICU, the nurses will help you to get comfortable touching and handling your baby. He or she already recognizes your voice from their time in the womb. Your touch will also help you be known by your baby as the one which always offers comfort. Most babies will be soothed by a gentle touch and a soft voice. Some are so tiny or so sick that stroking may be too much stimulation. Your nurse will help you learn to know your baby's cues, tolerance to activities and how to comfort them.  Learn more about ways you can care for your baby in the NICU.

Case Manager- A nurse who provides clinical expertise in coordinating with the patient care teams and with physicians who will care for a baby after hospital discharge, the education and services needed for parents and family to ensure timely and safe discharge for all newborns from Brandon NICU.

Chaplain - A professional from Pastoral Care or from the community.

Clinical Nurse Specialist - An advanced practice nurse who serves as an expert clinical resource for nurses, other health care providers, and families through consultation, education, research and leadership in newborn care.

Development Coordinator - A nurse who functions as a staff liaison and clinical expert in the developmental care needs of the newborn patient.

Dietitian – Our NICU Registered Dietitians have special expertise in the nutritional needs of newborns, including babies born prematurely. They assist the team in providing optimal nutrition for growth and health of the baby.

ECMO Specialist - Highly skilled nurses and respiratory therapists who are trained in operation of the ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a type of heart-lung bypass) circuit and provide complete, patient-centered care during a critical time in their hospital stay.

Fellow – A senior physician-in-training, who is learning to be a neonatologist, a pediatric surgeon or some other highly specialized field. They have already completed their resident training.

ICU Tech - A person who is supervised by, and specially trained to assist the nursing staff.

Lactation Consultant - A Certified Lactation Consultant is a specialist trained to focus on the needs and concerns of the breast-feeding mother-baby pair and to prevent, recognize, and solve breast-feeding difficulties.

NICU Nurse - A nurse specially educated in the care of premature or sick newborn babies.

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner - A nurse who has completed an advanced educational program in the care of premature or sick newborn babies. They work as part of a team with a neonatologist.

Neonatologist - A doctor (pediatrician) who specializes in the treatment of sick newborn babies. The neonatologists are in charge of the babies' medical care. Under their supervision, each baby is also cared for by a team consisting of fellows, residents, interns and neonatal nurse practitioners.

Nephrologist - A doctor who specializes in treatment of sick newborns with kidney problems.

Neurologist  - A doctor who specialized in the treatment of sick newborns with illnesses of the brain.

NeurosurgeonA doctor who specializes in surgical care of problems with the brain or spine.

Parent Host - A graduate parent whose baby has been in the Brandon NICU, whose role is to provide support to families of babies that are receiving care in the unit.. The Parent Host orients and assists families with the hospital experience through peer support, personal comfort, learning tools, and helping to navigate the hospital environment.

Pediatric Cardiologist - A doctor who specialized in the treatment of newborns with heart conditions.

Pediatric Surgeon - A subspecialty of surgery involving the surgery of fetuses, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Pediatric surgeons have completed residency and then two more years of specialty fellowship training in pediatric surgery.

Pharmacist – Our Clinical Pharmacists assist the team in management and adjustment of medication doses in our sick or premature newborn patients.

Physical Therapist - A team specially trained and experienced in a wide range of techniques to improve baby's muscle tone and movements.

Physician Assistant (PA) – A specially trained member of the Pediatric Surgery team who performs some tasks delegated by their supervising surgeon, like physical examination, writing orders for treatment, and performing or assisting with procedures.

Resident – A physician who has completed medical school and is training in a general area of practice, like pediatrics. An intern is a resident in their first year after medical school. Residents are supervised by senior physicians like our neonatologists.

Respiratory Therapist - A person specially educated and trained to help support the breathing of premature or sick newborn babies.

Social Worker - A professional who has received special training to help families deal with stressful situations. They listen to concerns and feelings, answer questions and assist families find resources to help meet their needs.

Speech Pathologist - A specially trained and experienced team providing treatment of feeding problems such as suck and swallow coordination or with birth defects such as cleft lip or palate.

Urologist - A doctor who specializes in surgical treatment of sick newborns with urinary tract problems.